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Emergency Preparedness 2016

Dalton Daily CItizen, Dalton Magazine

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22 Be Prepared — Emergency Guide Flooding safety Floods are frequent natural disasters that can cause widespread damage to homes, businesses and property in a hurry. They can also take lives. In water year 2012 (Oct. 1, 2011–Sept. 30, 2012), flooding caused 34 fatalities nationwide, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (www.noaa.gov). Flooding was also directly responsible for $500 million worth of damage. Types of flooding Once a river reaches flood stage, the National Weather Service places flood severity into one of three categories: minor, moderate and major. Each category has a definition based on property damage and public threat, and are explained below. • Minor flooding: Zero or very minimal property damage, but possibly a chance of public threat. • Moderate flooding: Some inundation of structures and roads near streams with necessary evacuations of people and property. • Major flooding: Extensive inundation of structures and roads with significant evacuations of people and property. Preparing for a flood The American Red Cross put together a list of essential items that can help you better prepare to withstand flooding. Here are a few highlights. Visit www.redcross.org/prepare /disaster/flood for the full list. • Water: At least a three-day supply; one gallon per person per day • Food: At least a three- day supply of non-perishable, easy-to- prepare food • First-Aid Kit • Seven-day supply of any critical medications • Sanitation and personal hygiene items • Extra cash • Maps of the area • Baby and pet supplies if applicable • Insect repellent and sunscreen Turn around, don't drown A flash flood can happen in a hurry, which can cause people to act without taking the time to think about potential dangers. Half of all people killed in floods are those in vehicles, according to the NOAA. The organization urges drivers to remember the simple mantra "Turn Around, Don't Drown" – return to higher ground -- if faced with flood waters on the road.

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