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ED January 2015

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Club Bulletin January 2015 11 www.ExoticDancer.com incorporate easy and crowd-pleasing fried foods into the menu, but don't let your concept limit these offerings. Purchasing commercial kitchen equipment for the bar Adding on a food service menu to your existing bar service means that you'll need more than liquor pourers and beer glasses in your supply cabinet. Chances are that you'll need at least a few commercial kitchen equipment items to help make your food menu come to life. Consider your available space: First, take stock of your bar area. Many adult nightclub and bar operators need to consider renovating existing space in order to add a kitchen and tables for dining. Others may have an existing room near the bar which they can outfit with the proper cooking equipment. It may take an inspection to see what equipment, if any, you can install and operate safely. A restaurant inspector or HVAC professional should be able to instruct you on where you can install cooking equipment. Choose the right equipment: When you know what foods you want to cook and what space you have available, it makes it much easier to determine what types of commercial equipment you need. Here are some common pieces of equipment an adult nightclub may need to support a food menu: Commercial deep fryer: From frying up fish and chips to making mozzarella sticks, fried foods are often a menu staple. Choose a countertop model if your space is limited. Countertop convection oven: Personal pizzas, nachos and melted sandwiches are a common food item at the bar, and countertop pizza ovens are a good way to cook them without using a giant pizza deck oven or conveyor oven. Commercial panini maker: Whip up hot sandwiches in no time with a commercial panini maker. Sandwiches are perfect lunch and dinner items and go well with fries or potato chips. Integrate food service into your bar service Many adult nightclubs and bars are actually required to serve food as per their food and beverage license contract. In this case, it's essential that your bartenders and servers have training on serving food in addition to beverages. Structure service hours to manage labor: It's important to set hours for food service to maximize labor efficiency. For instance, it may make most sense to serve bar food during the hours of 5 pm and 10 pm, when most patrons will be hungry. Of course, your bar itself will stay open outside those hours. Scheduling special dining service hours can help ensure that you don't over-staff during slower hours. Pair your bar food with your specialty drink menu: Often, patrons look for a beer that compliments their chosen entree, or a cheese plate that will bring out the subtler notes in their red wine. When you can suggest different types of drinks to pair with your food items and vice versa, you may see even more involvement from customers eager for a fuller dining and drinking experience. Bridging the gap between kitchen staff and bartenders: Deciding who will do the cooking is a big part of food service, especially in the bar. Depending on your current staff, the proximity of your bar to the kitchen and the general flow of operations, you may choose to hire additional kitchen staff or simply add cooking to your bartenders' responsibilities. If you do decide to hire additional staff, consider the following positions: Line cook: This person essentially does all the cooking in the bar/restaurant. Chef: For more upscale operations, a chef is essential to creating menu items and constructing creative dishes. Dishwasher: All food service operations needs a reliable, effective method of washing and sanitizing dinnerware. How bar food increases overall profits The big questions when implementing food into your beverage operation really has to do with how it will impact your operation's overall profits. After all, such a grand operational change requires some return on investment. Here are some guidelines to ensure that incorporating food into your bar menu will indeed benefit your bottom line: Keep it simple: When you select foods that aren't First, take stock of your bar area. Many adult nightclub and bar operators need to consider renovating existing space in order to add a kitchen and tables for dining. Others may have an existing room near the bar which they can outfit with the proper cooking equipment. It may take an inspection to see what equipment, if any, you can install and operate safely. A restaurant inspector or HVAC professional should be able to instruct you on where you can install cooking equipment.

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